MARRIED WOMEN SHOULD UNDERSTAND THEIR FAMILY FINANCES BEFORE DEATH OR DIVORCE PART THEM FROM THEIR MONEY

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I recently read a timely article at bloomberg.com, talking about the difficulties many post divorce women face financially, due to them not having participated in the handling of family finances while they were married.  Back then, their spouses handled the finances, who turned out to be better equipped in dealing with family related financial issues after the divorce was completed. Now, as newly single women, many wives who had left the money matters to the men, wish they hadn’t.

In Rise of ‘Gray’ Divorce Forces Financial Reckoning After 50, Suzanne Woolley writes of how “too many women” let their husbands make the long-term financial decisions, which has left them vulnerable when separation or death strikes.  That’s why it’s so important for any woman, married or not, young or old, to take the time to learn about the finances that affect them and their families, before death or divorce throw ungodly financial surprises upon you.  This is a regular instance with many family law clients. Many women, looking deer-lost in headlights, not having really any clear idea of the true nature of their family finances, seek legal advice related to family financial matters.  Surprise and shock are common responses when discussing the issues surrounding the division of community property. Issues related to income, expenses, assets, and debts might be clouded, personal property and community property commingled, or assets going unaccounted for.

By developing understanding of your financial affairs you will be better prepared to make the big financial decisions that you might have let your spouses make when you were still married.  Understanding family finances better helps to avoid the “nasty surprises” at the end, that your divorce lawyer will have to help you clean up.

Woolley notes some interesting facts relating to women and their investing, citing statistics from a survey found in a report called, “Own Your Worth,” which was released by UBS Global Wealth Management.

  • 56 percent of married women still leave major investing and financial planning decisions to their spouse.  
  • 61 percent of millennial women said they leave investment decisions to their husbands.
  • 54 percent of baby boomer women leave investment decisions to their husbands.
  • Twice as many men as women in the UBS survey said they were highly knowledgeable about investing.
  • Three-quarters of the women surveyed said they don’t know much about investing.

Woolley’s article also cites a stark difference between married women and women who were divorced or widowed regarding the “making (of) major financial decisions” during their marriage  She cites, for example, that:

  • 59 percent of widows and divorcees regret not taking part in long-term financial planning when they were a couple.
  • 85 percent of married women who weren’t active in making long-term financial decisions said their spouse knows more about financial issues than they do.
  • Eighty percent of women said they were content with how financial responsibilities were handled in their marriage.

The report concluded that a majority of married women are still handing over to their spouses important financial decisions that will profoundly affect their futures.  Women and divorcees who now find themselves alone wish they had been more involved in finances while they were married, says the UBS Global Wealth Management Report. Nearly all of them advise other women to get more involved early on and “break the cycle of financial abdication.”

WOMEN SHOULD BREAK THE CYCLE OF FINANCIAL ABDICATION

The UBS report cites “eight out of 10” divorced or widowed women who remarried as finding themselves to be “more active in the financial decision-making in their current relationship.”  Ninety-four percent of widows and divorcees surveyed insist on complete financial transparency with their spouse.

Again, for all women who are trying to make it work financially, you have one financial bottom line, and that is if you haven’t already — get involved now!  Wake up to the economic realities we all face right now in trying to move our families forward in a healthy and prosperous way. When the divorce comes about, you will be prepared in important aspects.  Remember that subsequent marriages have a higher rate of dissolving than do first marriages. So understand the income, expenses, assets and debts formula your family operates under now.

If you are a married woman, be involved with your husband when making all financial decisions.  You’re signature and / or consent is going to be required for most family related financial instruments, so you might as well understand what you are signing, and why.  If a divorcing woman understands her finances, and she can communicate rationally and intelligently with her spouse, come time for the divorce, she can conceivably steer the mediation of the division of the community property and in the long run save her and her family a lot of money and emotional expense.  If she needs an attorney or divorce mediator to help her with the process, she can always hire a family law specialist.

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HOW DO YOU PREPARE YOUR FAMILY FOR A FINANCIAL RESET?

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Does anybody who’s ever tried keeping their family’s heads above treacherous financial waters have any idea what in the world is going on right now?  Overseas, we’ve got accusations of chemical attacks and fake chemical attacks simultaneously coming out of Syria and England.  We’ve got threats of a major trade war between the United States and China.

Domestically, we’ve got a U.S. dollar that is worth four cents on the dollar, with the value declining as I write this.  The U.S. bond market and stock market, both pegged to the U.S. dollar, are filled with too high prices and too much risk, so they no longer provide a guaranteed safe haven to protect our assets from the declining U.S. dollar.

We have President Trump with his tax cuts, and Central Banks that are talking about raising the interest rates.  Our economy has been stretched to the max.  This last series of programs that were put into action by the Federal Reserve Bank since our last crash in 2008 have failed.  And all of this is happening at the exact same time.  It’s a recipe for disaster, and now someone is talking about a complete financial “reset,” and we have to wonder how that will affect our ability to feed and clothe our families during difficult days to come.

Why is all of this happening right now?  According to Lynette Zang, Chief Marketing Analyst at ITM Trading, ten years of American Central Bank failures means that all of the fiat money assets that were targeted for “‘reflation’ have created tremendous bubbles, and now they’re trying to undo the experiments with our economy.”  They’re trying to undo what?

Zang, who has worked in commercial banking since 1986, says what we have witnessed is a Central Bank rally followed by what appears to be a Central Bank crash — with whatever is to follow.

“The Fed is going to start tapering their stimulus,” the former stock broker and investment banker says.  In other words, print, print, print money is all we know, and now the scant part of that flow that came down to us is being cut off.

Zang says what fuels this whole financial system, which is called a “fiat currency system”, is the constantly compounding debt.  “And interest rates are the tools that they use to speed that up or slow that down,” she says.

Our problem is the world has been anchored at zero percent interest for too long.  “That means they’re out of the tools that they typically would use to do that,” Zang says, “which is why they’re trying to unwind and normalize something that isn’t normal to begin with.”

Our money system is not normal to begin with because it is based on debt.  The best we can do in our present day financial reality is borrow more, of what the Federal Reserve “prints”, so we can buy what we can afford to borrow — at a price, that compounds daily with interest.  And now the Federal Reserve Bank has no more tools to keep it going.  The American financial house of cards is rapidly crashing, and what exactly that means to us, the average person struggling to make a living and raise a family of four, will be up to us.

According to Zang, “they’ve” been calling for a “reset” since 2013, and “they’ve” run out of options.  There’s no purchasing power left in the U.S. dollar.  All the currencies in the world that are tied to the U.S. dollar have eroded over time due to inflation, to near worthlessness.  And that’s what all of our family law community assets are tied into.  It’s all going down the tubes.

“They’re talking about a financial reset,” Zang says, “but it looks more like a planned demolition.”  The Central Banks are in huge trouble.

We, here, in the real world, have no choice but to get our heads around this concept of a new financial reset.  We need to understand what’s going on.  Big changes are happening to us and we’re not being told about it straight forward.  We need to find answers to tough questions.  We need to ask those tough questions.  We need to understand how this financial crisis that is happening, and is apparently going to get much worse, is going to affect us if we’re an average family of four who just happens to be going through the biggest crisis of our lives, and it’s called divorce.

So what is a financial “reset”?  Is it getting rid of the debt, a new currency?  What?
“Transitioning us into the new financial system,” Zang says cryptically.  “Establishing the new financial system they have in mind, which ties into cryptocurrencies and cyberspace.”

If what Zang says is true, then the situation we find ourselves in appears clear enough.  We are going from a debt based financial system to one that is centered around crypto currencies, cyberspace, and digital money controlled by a central governing process.

If we’ve gone to the grocery store lately or tried to buy movie tickets we know our dollar is buying less.  Everything we own seems to be going down in value while everything we need gets too expensive to buy.  We’re forced to settle for less and make difficult choices as to how we’re going to spend our precious remaining financial resources.

The old financial system that started under U.S. President Richard Nixon in 1971 was based on debt.  That debt, and all the compounded interest that has accrued on it, stands today as not payable.  And the interest on that debt continues to add up.

Zang says a “reset” to the financial system begins with a reset of the debt.  She says we have been dealing with nothing but compounding interest, which is “what creates money in the system, and we’re never going to get out of debt.”  It’s the way the system was built and they are going to have to “reset” the debt, so we will be able to continue to function economically as individuals and a nation.  But at what price?

Our currency, the U.S. dollars we spend to buy food, gas, and clothing, are merely debt instruments that don’t pay interest.  Our financial system is based on the foundation of never ending debt.  We’ve reached the end of the line.  Compounding interest will never be paid off.  “It has to reset.”  “The system doesn’t work anymore.”  “It died in 2008.”  “It’s a zombie system.”  “The entire system will crash.”  These are Lynette Zang’s words, not mine.

And the question remains.  What do families have to do to have a chance to survive in a rapidly changing world like this?  The answer is they have to learn the truth of the world that swirls by them while they’re busy making plans, or playing with their cell phones.  Heads of families have to take the time to learn to understand what is truly going on in the economic realm in which they live.  Right now, we in America are living on borrowed time, financially, and most of us don’t even realize it.  We might be aware that something is going on, that bills are becoming difficult to pay, but we don’t really pay attention to finding solution to our ever increasing financial difficulties.

That’s why we’ve got to deal with the true nature of today’s realities, financially and otherwise.  We’ve got to do our homework.  We’ve got to weed out the lies in information we receive and determine who’s telling the truth.  We’ve got to understand that, financially, our dollar may be about to disappear.  That there most probably is some kind of major change coming to our financial system and the currency we will use to live on.  That we’re going to have to understand what that is all about, how it will affect us, so we can figure out how to preserve what assets we have left.  We must learn to understand how a financial “reset” will affect the future of our families.

Where does your family stand on this?